Apologizing for Socrates
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Apologizing for Socrates how Plato and Xenophon created our Socrates by Gabriel Danzig

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Published by Lexington Books in Lanham, Md .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [265]-274) and index.

StatementGabriel Danzig
Classifications
LC ClassificationsB317 .D27 2010
The Physical Object
Pagination280 p. ;
Number of Pages280
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24476616M
ISBN 109780739132449, 9780739132463
LC Control Number2009042371

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The Apology of Socrates by Plato, is the Socratic dialogue that presents the speech of legal self-defence, which Socrates presented at his trial for impiety and corruption, in BC. Specifically, the Apology of Socrates is a defence against "not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel" to Athens/5(). The Apology is Plato's version of the speech given by Socrates as he unsuccessfully defended himself in BC against the charges of "corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel"/5(14). The Apology is Plato's version of the speech given by Socrates as he defended himself in BC against the charges of "corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel." "Apology" here has its earlier meaning of speaking in defense of a cause or of one's beliefs or actions/5(21). Apology of Socrates book. Read 1, reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Preface: This edition, which is intended for those who have /5.

An Essay on Plato's Apology of Socrates. Author: C. D. C. Reeve; Publisher: Hackett Publishing ISBN: Category: Philosophy Page: View: DOWNLOAD NOW» "Reeve's book is an excellent companion to Plato's Apology and a valuable discussion of many of the main issues that arise in the early dialogues. In The Apology, Socrates attributes the embarrassment that he has caused some others to the message he received from the oracle. In trying to figure out the accurate meaning of the message, he felt himself destined to expose those who hold onto their false ideas of what true wisdom is. In the Apology Socrates suggests that this play has damaged his chances of getting a fair hearing in court, and there is the play – and you can see not only why it would have done so much harm, but also how deeply into the fabric of Greek thinking philosophical ideas had permeated. There’s even a bit at the end where the just argument and the unjust argument have a discussion with each other. Plato's The Apology is an account of the speech Socrates makes at the trial in which he is charged with not recognizing the gods recognized by the state, inventing new deities, and corrupting the youth of Athens. Socrates' speech, however, is by no means an "apology" in our modern understanding of .

Plato’s Apology of Socrates How you, men of Athens, have been affected by my accusers, I do 17a not know 1. For my part, even I nearly forgot myself because of them, so persuasively did they speak. And yet they have said, so to speak, nothing true. I wondered most at one of the many falsehoods. The Apology of Socrates by Plato was thought to have been written following Socrates trial and death in BC. It is one of many such accounts of this infamous trial. It is only through the Apology that we are today able to learn more about this most venerable Greek philosopher, Socrates, as he left very little written work himself. As a teacher and mentor to hundreds of young students, his thoughts and ideas 5/5(1). "The Apology" here has its earlier meaning (now usually expressed by the word "apologia") of speaking in defense of a cause or of one's beliefs or actions. The Apology begins with Socrates saying he does not know if the men of Athens (his jury) have been persuaded by his accusers. This first sentence is crucial to the theme of the entire speech.   Apologizing for Socrates examines some of Plato's and Xenophon's Socratic writings, specifically those that address well-known controversiese concerning the life and death of Socrates. Gabriel Danzig argues that the effort to defend Socrates from a variety of contemporary charges helps explain some of the central philosophical arguments and literary features that appear in these :